Moray House College of Education

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The establishment of Moray House College of Education out of the Edinburgh Provincial Training Centre was a result of the increased autonomy given to the colleges post 1959 and as they took control of their own educational organisation.

Historical Context

The burgeoning birth rate after the Second World War, coupled with an increasing wastage rate among trained women teachers, led to an acute shortage of teachers. It was forecast in 1957 that the shortage could rise to some 3000 teachers within four years.

There was also an increasing gender imbalance, with men making up only 17% of the total intake in 1962. Whilst Emergency and Special recruitment schemes were established, to attract returning service personnel, these failed to address the underlying problem.

The Colleges of Education

In 1959 a new structure for Teacher Training was introduced with the National Committee and the four Provincial Committees being swept away. Whilst the Secretary of State retained overall control of the sector, the individual colleges were given much greater autonomy.

Each college of education had its own Board of Governors widely representative of educational interests. Governors were responsible for awarding successful students their Certificates and Diplomas, and formal Graduation Ceremonies were introduced. Each College appointed a Principal as the senior manager with William Buchan Inglis (1901-1971) being Moray House College of Education’s first such appointee.

At Moray House the Governors delegated to the Board of Studies responsibility for the organisation of the college’s courses, the development of appropriate syllabuses, and the assessment of students. With the loss of the post covering both the role of Professor of Education and Director of Studies in 1951 the links with Edinburgh University became less close, although there was still joint teaching on the University’s Diploma in Education course.

Reconstitution as Moray House Institute of Education

In 1991, the College was reconstituted as Moray House Institute of Education, as the result of a legal agreement with Heriot-Watt University. Under this new arrangement, Moray House's students would be matriculated students of Heriot-Watt, receiving degrees from that university’s Senate.

Related Pages

Merger with Moray House Institute of Education, 1998